If Valid HTML is Not a Ranking Factor, Then Who Cares

The beloved Mr. Cutts has just made the job of web marketers more difficult. By telling us that broken HTML is not a ranking factor, he has effectively removed one of the key incentives for companies to fix their code. Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate the honesty, but bad, broken or poorly-structured code is […]

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September 26, 2013

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The beloved Mr. Cutts has just made the job of web marketers more difficult. By telling us that broken HTML is not a ranking factor, he has effectively removed one of the key incentives for companies to fix their code.

Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate the honesty, but bad, broken or poorly-structured code is a problem on many websites. While it may not effect SEO, it does effect user-experience.

Cutts does point out that valid code is easier to manage & easier to upgrade; however, that may not be enough incentive for business owners and developers to invest time in cleanups and corrections.

I wouldn’t be surprised if marketers start having problems getting broken links and other web elements fixed because of this post.

Maybe I’m overstating the risk here, but I think good code makes everyone’s job easier. What do you think? Is this going to make html fixes a harder thing to push for in your organization? Let me know in the comments.

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